Organ meat in a raw diet

Organ meat is a very important aspect of many raw diets. Extremely nutrient dense, it is almost like the “multivitamin” of the raw diet. Without organs, a diet can easily become deficient in many vitamins (especially vitamin A) and minerals. But organ meat is also very rich, which can cause diarrhea and/or dark, tarry stools if too much is fed at a time; and if fed long term in large quantities, too much organ meat could make the diet too high in vitamins and minerals, which can cause health issues in the long run. For optimal health, it is important to feed organ meat in proper amounts.

What is considered organ meat in a raw diet?

Generally, we think of organs as anything within the body cavity of an animal: liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, heart, and so on. But when it comes to raw feeding, “organ meat” typically refers to secreting organs only – like liver, spleen, or kidney. That means muscular organs like heart or gizzards are actually fed as muscle meat instead of organ meat.

Tripe, the stomach of a ruminant animal (such as cow, sheep, goat, or deer), is also fed as muscle meat instead of organ. Click here for an in depth article about tripe.

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How much organ meat should I feed?

“Prey model” diets call for 5% of the diet to be liver and 5% of the diet to be other secreting organ(s). This means if your dog eats 1 lb a day, 0.05 lb (or 0.8 oz) of that should be liver and another 0.05 lb (or 0.8 oz) of that should be something like kidney or spleen. Organ doesn’t have to be fed every day; raw diets can be balanced over time, like over the span of a couple days or a week. Using the previous example of a dog eating 1 lb a day, that would mean 0.35 lb liver and 0.35 lb other organ should be fed weekly (or about 5.6 oz each). Don’t be afraid to round – you don’t need to obsess over all these decimal points!

Personally, I find it easier to put aside however much my dog needs to get weekly, then just feed it throughout the week. Then it doesn’t matter if your dog gets the same amount of organ every day; as long as you finish the amount you set aside by the end of the week, then you know your dog has gotten the right amount!

Why?

Why does the diet call for liver AND another organ? Liver is typically easier to find – why can’t you feed just liver?

Generally, the reason we feed half liver and half other organ for our 10% organ content in a raw diet is because we don’t want to feed too much of certain nutrients or not enough of others. Basically, they are supposed to balance each other out.

At the bottom of this article, I’ve included the nutrient analyses of a bunch of different organs so you can see the differences for yourself.

One of the most notable differences between liver and other organs is the vitamin A content. Liver is jam packed with vitamin A, while other organs are not. Vitamin A is one of only two vitamins which are possible to overdose on if given in excessive quantities, and vitamin A toxicosis can cause severe health issues [source].

That said, the toxicity level of vitamin A is extremely high [source], and would have to be fed for months or even years before the dog began to show symptoms of vitamin A toxicity. Still, it is very easy to end up with an extremely high amount of vitamin A when feeding liver as the entire 10% organ content, and just because your dog likely won’t start developing symptoms of overdose until months or years later doesn’t mean you should just overlook that possibility.

Also worth noting: if you look at the nutrient analyses at the bottom of this article, you will find that most liver contains around 20,000 to 25,000 IU of vitamin A per 100g, yet chicken liver only contains just over 11,000 IU. And on the other end of the spectrum, duck liver contains almost 40,000 IU! So feeding 10% of the diet as just duck liver will result in far greater amounts of vitamin A than if you fed 10% of the diet as only chicken liver. In fact, if you fed 10% chicken liver, that would contribute about the same amount of vitamin A to the diet as if you fed 5% pork or lamb liver, for example; but then the diet would also be pretty low in zinc, copper, and iron.

So, that leads to the question…

Is “5% liver, 5% other organ” foolproof?

Clearly, the answer is no. Just because you feed 5% liver, 5% other organ doesn’t mean you aren’t feeding an excess or deficiency of certain nutrients.

For example, what if someone was feeding 5% duck liver and 5% beef spleen as their organ content – that is following the correct percentages, so it sounds good, right?

Actually, it turns out duck liver and beef spleen both contain abnormally high levels of iron in comparison to other organ meats, which would result in a diet very high in iron. To illustrate this point, I calculated how much iron my own dog would get. He is a 6 year old, 80 pound Doberman. His recommended allowance of iron (per NRC guidelines) is about 14 mg per day. But if I fed him 5% duck liver and 5% beef spleen, he would be getting 33.8 mg of iron – and that is just the organ meat being fed alone! The rest of the diet would provide even more on top of that. That is over twice the recommended allowance of iron for this dog, and the rest of the diet could easily bump that up to around three times the recommended allowance of iron. Chronic iron toxicosis can occur when iron is repeatedly ingested at low levels that individually do not have adverse effects; this may lead to the development of iron deposits in the liver, heart, pancreas, and adrenal and parathyroid glands [source]. Too much iron can also interfere with the absorption of phosphorus.

Now, keep in mind, this is an extreme example. I’m just using it to prove my next point:

Percentages are just a guideline

As you can see, designing a diet around percentages isn’t perfect – so it is important to keep in mind that they are just a guideline, they aren’t foolproof, and there are always going to be exceptions. I would advise you to review what organs you’re feeding or planning on feeding and see if their nutrient profiles compliment each other, especially if you are only feeding one type of liver and one type of other organ.

Generally, I find that using 5% liver, 2.5% spleen, and 2.5% kidney tends to end up with a reasonable level of vitamin A and most minerals.

At the bottom of this article, I have included the nutrient analyses of some of the most common organ meats fed in raw diets, as well as the nutrient profiles of some common organ combinations.

When should I NOT feed organ meat?

There are some medical conditions that require a specific diet, and organ meat would not be appropriate for dogs with those conditions.

If your dog is not eating organ meat, you must supplement the diet to make up for the nutrients that organ meat would otherwise provide in a raw diet – otherwise, the diet will be severely deficient in many important vitamins and minerals. The nutrients you will have to supplement and in what quantities will depend on your dog’s condition and what the rest of the diet consists of. I recommend contacting a canine nutritionist such as Monica Segal or Cat Lane to determine a specialized diet that fits your dog’s specific needs.

Kidney disease

Organ meat is very high in phosphorus, which means it is not appropriate for dogs with kidney disease because damaged kidneys don’t efficiently metabolize phosphorus. This will result in high phosphorus in the blood, which can cause calcium to be pulled from the bones.

Hyperuricosuria

Dalmatians with hyperuricosuria, a genetic condition that affects the metabolism of protein waste products, should avoid foods high in purines. This is because their condition prohibits the body from properly breaking down purines into uric acid and then into allantoin, instead resulting in a build up of uric acid waste products, which can cause urate stones. Urate stones can form urinary blockages, which are a medical emergency requiring surgery to correct; they are very painful and can even result in death if not treated. Since organ meat is high in purines, Dalmatians with this condition should generally not be fed organ meats.

Copper storage hepatopathy

Liver is also high in copper, thus dogs with copper storage liver disease should not be fed liver because of their accumulation of copper in the liver. However, there are low copper organ meat choices which may be able to be fed sparingly (and careful measurement), such as chicken liver, turkey liver, or pork liver. Beef liver, duck liver, and lamb liver all contain high levels of copper and should be avoided completely.

Nutrient analyses of organ meats

The following information can be found in the USDA food composition database and/or SELF Nutrition Data. If a nutrient value shows “-“, this does not necessarily mean that the food item does not contain any of that nutrient at all, just that the information was not provided in any of the databases I used.

Chicken liver, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 76.5 g
Energy 119 kcal
Protein 16.9 g 71.9%
Fat 4.8 g 20.4%
Carbohydrate 0.7 g 3%
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 8 mg
Iron 9 mg
Magnesium 19 mg
Phosphorus 297 mg
Potassium 230 mg
Sodium 71 mg
Zinc 2.7 mg
Copper 0.5 mg
Manganese 0.3 mg
Selenium 54.6 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 11078 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 1.8 mg
Niacin 9.7 mg
Vitamin B6 0.9 mg
Folate 588 mcg
Pantothenic acid 6.2 mg
Vitamin B12 16.6 mcg
Vitamin C 17.9 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E 0.7 mg
Vitamin K 0 mcg
Turkey liver, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 75.5 g
Energy 128 kcal
Protein 18.3 g 74.7%
Fat 5.5 g 22.4%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 20 mg
Iron 8.9 mg
Magnesium 24 mg
Phosphorus 279 mg
Potassium 214 mg
Sodium 131 mg
Zinc 3.4 mg
Copper 0.4 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 70.8 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 26901 IU
Thiamin 0.2 mg
Riboflavin 2.2 mg
Niacin 11.2 mg
Vitamin B6 1 mg
Folate 677 mcg
Pantothenic acid 6.3 mg
Vitamin B12 19.7 mcg
Vitamin C 24.5 mg
Vitamin D 50 IU
Vitamin E 0.2 mg
Vitamin K 0.8 mcg
Duck liver, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 71.8 g
Energy 136 kcal
Protein 18.7 g 66.3%
Fat 4.6 g 16.3%
Carbohydrate 3.5 g 12.4%
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 11 mg
Iron 30.5 mg
Magnesium 24 mg
Phosphorus 269 mg
Potassium 230 mg
Sodium 140 mg
Zinc 3.1 mg
Copper 6 mg
Manganese 0.3 mg
Selenium 67 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 39907 IU
Thiamin 0.6 mg
Riboflavin 0.9 mg
Niacin 6.5 mg
Vitamin B6 0.8 mg
Folate 738 mcg
Pantothenic acid 6.2 mg
Vitamin B12 54 mcg
Vitamin C 4.5 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Beef liver, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 70.8 g
Energy 135 kcal
Protein 20.4 g 69.9%
Fat 3.6 g 12.3%
Carbohydrate 3.9 g 13.4%
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 5 mg
Iron 4.9 mg
Magnesium 18 mg
Phosphorus 387 mg
Potassium 313 mg
Sodium 69 mg
Zinc 4 mg
Copper 9.8 mg
Manganese 0.3 mg
Selenium 39.7 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 16898 IU
Thiamin 0.2 mg
Riboflavin 2.8 mg
Niacin 13.2 mg
Vitamin B6 1.1 mg
Folate 290 mcg
Pantothenic acid 7.2 mg
Vitamin B12 59.3 mcg
Vitamin C 1.3 mg
Vitamin D 16 IU
Vitamin E 0.4 mg
Vitamin K 3.1 mcg
Lamb liver, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 71.4 g
Energy 139 kcal
Protein 20.4 g 71.3%
Fat 5.0 g 17.5%
Carbohydrate 1.8 g 6.3%
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 7 mg
Iron 7.4 mg
Magnesium 19 mg
Phosphorus 364 mg
Potassium 313 mg
Sodium 70 mg
Zinc 4.7 mg
Copper 7 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 82.4 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 24612 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 3.6 mg
Niacin 16.1 mg
Vitamin B6 0.9 mg
Folate 230 mcg
Pantothenic acid 6.1 mg
Vitamin B12 90.1 mcg
Vitamin C 4 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Pork liver, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 71.1 g
Energy 134 kcal
Protein 21.4 g 74.0%
Fat 3.7 g 12.8%
Carbohydrate 2.5 g 8.7%
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 23.3 mg
Magnesium 18 mg
Phosphorus 288 mg
Potassium 273 mg
Sodium 87 mg
Zinc 5.8 mg
Copper 0.7 mg
Manganese 0.3 mg
Selenium 52.7 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 21650 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 3 mg
Niacin 15.3 mg
Vitamin B6 0.7 mg
Folate 212 mcg
Pantothenic acid 6.6 mg
Vitamin B12 26 mcg
Vitamin C 25.3 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Beef spleen, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 77.2 g
Energy 105 kcal
Protein 18.3 g 80.3%
Fat 3.0 g 13.2%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 44.6 mg
Magnesium 22 mg
Phosphorus 296 mg
Potassium 429 mg
Sodium 85 mg
Zinc 2.1 mg
Copper 0.2 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 62.2 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 0 IU
Thiamin 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.4 mg
Niacin 8.4 mg
Vitamin B6 0.1 mg
Folate 4 mcg
Pantothenic acid 1.1 mg
Vitamin B12 5.7 mcg
Vitamin C 45.5 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Lamb spleen, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 78.2 g
Energy 101 kcal
Protein 17.2 g 78.9%
Fat 3.1 g 14.2%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 41.9 mg
Magnesium 21 mg
Phosphorus 280 mg
Potassium 358 mg
Sodium 84 mg
Zinc 2.8 mg
Copper 0.1 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 32.4 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 0 IU
Thiamin 0.05 mg
Riboflavin 0.3 mg
Niacin 7.9 mg
Vitamin B6 0.1 mg
Folate 4 mcg
Pantothenic acid mg
Vitamin B12 5.3 mcg
Vitamin C 23 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Pork spleen, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 78.4 g
Energy 100 kcal
Protein 17.9 g 82.9%
Fat 2.6 g 12.0%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 10 mg
Iron 22.3 mg
Magnesium 13 mg
Phosphorus 260 mg
Potassium 396 mg
Sodium 98 mg
Zinc 2.5 mg
Copper 0.1 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 32.8 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 0 IU
Thiamin 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.3 mg
Niacin 5.9 mg
Vitamin B6 0.1 mg
Folate 4 mcg
Pantothenic acid 1.1 mg
Vitamin B12 3.3 mcg
Vitamin C 28.5 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Lamb kidney, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 79.2 g
Energy 97 kcal
Protein 15.7 g 75.5%
Fat 3.0 g 14.4%
Carbohydrate 0.8 g 4%
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 13 mg
Iron 6.4 mg
Magnesium 17 mg
Phosphorus 246 mg
Potassium 277 mg
Sodium 156 mg
Zinc 2.2 mg
Copper 0.4 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 127 mcg
Iodine  –
Vitamins
Vitamin A 316 IU
Thiamin 0.6 mg
Riboflavin 2.2 mg
Niacin 7.5 mg
Vitamin B6 0.2 mg
Folate 28 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.2 mg
Vitamin B12 52.4 mcg
Vitamin C 11 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Pork kidney, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 80.1 g
Energy 100 kcal
Protein 16.5 g 82.9%
Fat 3.3 g 16.6%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 4.9 mg
Magnesium 17 mg
Phosphorus 204 mg
Potassium 229 mg
Sodium 121 mg
Zinc 2.8 mg
Copper 0.6 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 190 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 198 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 1.7 mg
Niacin 8.2 mg
Vitamin B6 0.4 mg
Folate 42 mcg
Pantothenic acid 3.1 mg
Vitamin B12 8.5 mcg
Vitamin C 13.3 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Beef kidney, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 77.9 g
Energy 99 kcal
Protein 17.4 g 78.7%
Fat 3.1 g 14.0%
Carbohydrate 0.3 g 1%
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 13 mg
Iron 4.6 mg
Magnesium 17 mg
Phosphorus 257 mg
Potassium 262 mg
Sodium 182 mg
Zinc 1.9 mg
Copper 0.4 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 141 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 1397 IU
Thiamin 0.4 mg
Riboflavin 2.8 mg
Niacin 8 mg
Vitamin B6 0.7 mg
Folate 98 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4 mg
Vitamin B12 27.5 mcg
Vitamin C 9.4 mg
Vitamin D 45 IU
Vitamin E 0.2 mg
Vitamin K mcg
Beef pancreas, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 65.2 g
Energy 235 kcal
Protein 15.7 g 45.1%
Fat 18.6 g 53.4%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 2.2 mg
Magnesium 18 mg
Phosphorus 327 mg
Potassium 276 mg
Sodium 67 mg
Zinc 2.6 mg
Copper 0.1 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 24.7 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 0 IU
Thiamin 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.4 mg
Niacin 4.5 mg
Vitamin B6 0.2 mg
Folate 3 mcg
Pantothenic acid 3.9 mg
Vitamin B12 14 mcg
Vitamin C 13.7 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Pork pancreas, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 67.2 g
Energy 199 kcal
Protein 18.6 g 56.7%
Fat 13.2 g 40.2%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 11 mg
Iron 2.1 mg
Magnesium 17 mg
Phosphorus 234 mg
Potassium 197 mg
Sodium 44 mg
Zinc 2.6 mg
Copper 0.1 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 40.8 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 0 IU
Thiamin 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.5 mg
Niacin 3.5 mg
Vitamin B6 0.5 mg
Folate 3 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.6 mg
Vitamin B12 16.4 mcg
Vitamin C 15.3 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Beef thymus/sweetbread, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 67.8 g
Energy 236 kcal
Protein 12.2 g 37.9%
Fat 20.4 g 63.4%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 7 mg
Iron 2.1 mg
Magnesium 14 mg
Phosphorus 393 mg
Potassium 360 mg
Sodium 96 mg
Zinc 2.1 mg
Copper 0 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 18.1 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 65 IU
Thiamin 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.1 mg
Niacin 2 mg
Vitamin B6 0.04 mg
Folate 2 mcg
Pantothenic acid 3 mg
Vitamin B12 2.1 mcg
Vitamin C 34 mg
Vitamin D 25 IU
Vitamin E 0.7 mg
Vitamin K mcg
Beef brain, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 76.3 g
Energy 143 kcal
Protein 10.9 g 50.0%
Fat 10.3 g 43.5%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 43 mg
Iron 2.5 mg
Magnesium 13 mg
Phosphorus 362 mg
Potassium 274 mg
Sodium 126 mg
Zinc 1 mg
Copper 0.3 mg
Manganese 0 mg
Selenium 21.3 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 147 IU
Thiamin 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.2 mg
Niacin 3.6 mg
Vitamin B6 0.2 mg
Folate 3 mcg
Pantothenic acid 2 mg
Vitamin B12 9.5 mcg
Vitamin C 10.7 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E 1 mg
Vitamin K 0 mcg
Lamb brain, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 78.2 g
Energy 122 kcal
Protein 10.4 g 47.7%
Fat 8.6 g 39.4%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 1.8 mg
Magnesium 12 mg
Phosphorus 270 mg
Potassium 296 mg
Sodium 112 mg
Zinc 1.2 mg
Copper 0.2 mg
Manganese 0 mg
Selenium 9 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 0 IU
Thiamin 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.3 mg
Niacin 3.9 mg
Vitamin B6 0.3 mg
Folate 3 mcg
Pantothenic acid 0.9 mg
Vitamin B12 11.3 mcg
Vitamin C 16 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
Pork brain, raw (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 78.4 g
Energy 127 kcal
Protein 10.3 g 47.7%
Fat 9.2 g 42.6%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 10 mg
Iron 1.6 mg
Magnesium 14 mg
Phosphorus 282 mg
Potassium 258 mg
Sodium 120 mg
Zinc 1.3 mg
Copper 0.2 mg
Manganese 0.1 mg
Selenium 15.9 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 0 IU
Thiamin 0.2 mg
Riboflavin 0.3 mg
Niacin 4.3 mg
Vitamin B6 0.2 mg
Folate 6 mcg
Pantothenic acid 2.8 mg
Vitamin B12 2.2 mcg
Vitamin C 13.5 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg

Nutrient analyses of organ mixes

These analyses will be for specific combinations of organs that are commonly fed.

What am I looking for?

Ideally, you want to see less than 10,000 IU vitamin A, a higher level of zinc than copper, and iron in the low to mid teens.

Here are some of the mixes that fit that description (or are close enough to deserve a shoutout):

  • 50% chicken liver, 25% beef spleen, 25% beef kidney
  • 50% chicken liver, 25% pork spleen, 25% pork kidney
  • 50% turkey liver, 25% pork spleen, 25% pork kidney
  • 50% turkey liver, 25% beef spleen, 25% beef kidney
  • 50% beef & pork liver, 50% beef & pork spleen/kidney

Of course, I’m not trying to imply that these are the only organ combinations that should be fed. I am limited by what is available in the USDA or SELF databases, and by time (all these calculations are time consuming, even with the priceless assistance of Google Sheets… so, you’re welcome! :P).

50% beef liver, 25% beef kidney, 25% beef spleen (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 74.2 g
Energy 119 kcal
Protein 19.1 g 74.1%
Fat 3.3 g 12.9%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 8.0 mg
Iron 14.8 mg
Magnesium 19 mg
Phosphorus 332 mg
Potassium 329 mg
Sodium 101 mg
Zinc 3.0 mg
Copper 5.1 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 70.7 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 8798 IU
Thiamin 0.2 mg
Riboflavin 2.2 mg
Niacin 10.7 mg
Vitamin B6 0.8 mg
Folate 170.5 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.9 mg
Vitamin B12 38.0 mcg
Vitamin C 14.4 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% lamb liver, 25% lamb spleen, 25% lamb kidney (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 75.1 g
Energy 119 kcal
Protein 18.4 g 73.8%
Fat 4.0 g 16.1%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 15.8 mg
Magnesium 19 mg
Phosphorus 314 mg
Potassium 316 mg
Sodium 95 mg
Zinc 3.6 mg
Copper 3.6 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 81.1 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 12385 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 2.4 mg
Niacin 11.9 mg
Vitamin B6 0.5 mg
Folate 123 mcg
Pantothenic acid 5.2 mg
Vitamin B12 59.5 mcg
Vitamin C 10.5 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% pork liver, 25% pork kidney, 25% pork spleen (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 75.2 g
Energy 117 kcal
Protein 19.3 g 77.7%
Fat 3.3 g 13.4%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9.3 mg
Iron 18.5 mg
Magnesium 17 mg
Phosphorus 260 mg
Potassium 293 mg
Sodium 98 mg
Zinc 4.2 mg
Copper 0.5 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 82.1 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 10875 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 2 mg
Niacin 11.2 mg
Vitamin B6 0.5 mg
Folate 117.5 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.4 mg
Vitamin B12 16 mcg
Vitamin C 23.1 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% chicken liver, 25% pork spleen, 25% pork kidney (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 77.9 g
Energy 110 kcal
Protein 17.1 g 77.1%
Fat 3.9 g 17.5%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 11.3 mg
Magnesium 17 mg
Phosphorus 265 mg
Potassium 271 mg
Sodium 90 mg
Zinc 2.7 mg
Copper 0.4 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 83.0 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 5589 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 1.4 mg
Niacin 8.4 mg
Vitamin B6 0.6 mg
Folate 305.5 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.2 mg
Vitamin B12 11.3 mcg
Vitamin C 19.4 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% turkey liver, 25% pork spleen, 25% pork kidney (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 77.4 g
Energy 114 kcal
Protein 17.8 g  78.5%
Fat 4.2 g  18.7%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 15 mg
Iron 11.3 mg
Magnesium 20 mg
Phosphorus 256 mg
Potassium 263 mg
Sodium 120 mg
Zinc 3.0 mg
Copper 0.4 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 91.1 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 13500 IU
Thiamin 0.2 mg
Riboflavin 1.6 mg
Niacin 9.1 mg
Vitamin B6 0.6 mg
Folate 350 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.2 mg
Vitamin B12 12.8 mcg
Vitamin C 22.7 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% chicken liver, 25% beef kidney, 25% beef spleen (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 77.0 g
Energy 111 kcal
Protein 17.4 g 75.6%
Fat 3.9 g 17.1%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 10 mg
Iron 16.8 mg
Magnesium 19 mg
Phosphorus 287 mg
Potassium 289 mg
Sodium 102 mg
Zinc 2.4 mg
Copper 0.4 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 78.1 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 5888 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 1.7 mg
Niacin 9 mg
Vitamin B6 0.7 mg
Folate 319.5 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.4 mg
Vitamin B12 16.6 mcg
Vitamin C 22.7 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% turkey liver, 25% beef kidney, 25% beef spleen (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 76.5 g
Energy 115 kcal
Protein 18.1 g 77.0%
Fat 4.3 g 18.2%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 16 mg
Iron 16.8 mg
Magnesium 22 mg
Phosphorus 278 mg
Potassium 280 mg
Sodium 132 mg
Zinc 2.7 mg
Copper 0.4 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 86.2 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 13800 IU
Thiamin 0.2 mg
Riboflavin 1.9 mg
Niacin 9.7 mg
Vitamin B6 0.7 mg
Folate 364 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.4 mg
Vitamin B12 18.2 mcg
Vitamin C 26 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% pork liver, 25% beef kidney, 25% beef spleen (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 74.3 g
Energy 118 kcal
Protein 19.6 g 76.4%
Fat 3.4 g 13.1%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 10 mg
Iron 24 mg
Magnesium 19 mg
Phosphorus 282 mg
Potassium 309 mg
Sodium 110 mg
Zinc 3.9 mg
Copper 0.5 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 77.2 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 11174 IU
Thiamin 0.3 mg
Riboflavin 2.3 mg
Niacin 11.8 mg
Vitamin B6 0.6 mg
Folate 131.5 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.6 mg
Vitamin B12 21.3 mcg
Vitamin C 26.4 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
50% beef & pork liver, 50% beef & pork kidney/spleen (per 100g)
Macronutrients Dry Matter Basis
Water 74.7
Energy 118
Protein 19.2 75.9%
Fat 3.3 13.1%
Carbohydrate
Minerals Unit of weight
Calcium 9 mg
Iron 16.6 mg
Magnesium 18 mg
Phosphorus 296 mg
Potassium 311 mg
Sodium 100 mg
Zinc 3.6 mg
Copper 2.8 mg
Manganese 0.2 mg
Selenium 76.4 mcg
Iodine
Vitamins
Vitamin A 9836 IU
Thiamin 0.2 mg
Riboflavin 2.1 mg
Niacin 10.9 mg
Vitamin B6 0.6 mg
Folate 144 mcg
Pantothenic acid 4.6 mg
Vitamin B12 27 mcg
Vitamin C 18.7 mg
Vitamin D IU
Vitamin E mg
Vitamin K mcg
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5 comments

  1. Hello, I enjoy your articles, they are very informative and I really admire the hard work behind them. I was just wondering about the NRC guidelines, because in the table of requirements it says “Nutrient requirements are indicated on a dry-matter basis and are per kg of diet” what does the dry-matter mean?
    Thank you

    Like

  2. Hi! I am currently unable to feed fresh organ meat so I am using dried liver treats instead. How can I account for the weight of the water that is lost in dehydrating/freeze-drying? I find when I try to eyeball it, I tend to overfeed and cause loose stools. But, I also don’t want to underfeed it since it is their only source of offal for the time being. I read somewhere that liver is 75% water but can’t find the source!! So, does that mean I would reduce the weight by 75%?? Any help is appreciated!

    Like

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